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If Customer does not meet all of these requirements, Customer must not access or use the Website.We may revise and update these Terms of Use from time to time at our sole discretion.Jack Kerouac began keeping journals as a fourteen-year-old boy, in 1936, and continued to do so—somewhat obsessively—until his death, at age forty-seven.The following entries span the years from 1948, when the twenty-five-year-old Kerouac had recently returned to New York from a cross-country trip, to 1950, when his first book, “The Town and the City,” was published.Here, in one of the first cases the Court has taken to address the relationship between the First Amendment and the modern Internet, the Court must exercise extreme caution before suggesting that the First Amendment provides scant protection for access to vast networks in that medium. Even assuming that the statute is content neutral and thus subject to intermediate scrutiny, the provision is not “ ‘ “narrowly tailored to serve a significant governmental interest.” ’ ” , 573 U. It is also clear that “sexual abuse of a child is a most serious crime and an act repugnant to the moral instincts of a decent people,” , 394 U. Even with these assumptions, the statute here enacts a prohibition unprecedented in the scope of First Amendment speech it burdens. In 2008, North Carolina enacted a statute making it a felony for a registered sex offender to gain access to a number of websites, including commonplace social media websites like Facebook and Twitter. Second, it “[f]acilitates the social introduction between two or more persons for the purposes of friendship, meeting other persons, or information exchanges.” Third, it “[a]llows users to create Web pages or personal profiles that contain information such as the name or nickname of the user, photographs placed on the personal Web page by the user, other personal information about the user, and links to other personal Web pages on the commercial social networking Web site of friends or associates of the user that may be accessed by other users or visitors to the Web site.” The statute includes two express exemptions. III This background informs the analysis of the North Carolina statute at issue. But the assertion of a valid governmental interest “cannot, in every context, be insulated from all constitutional protections.” , 394 U. First, given the broad wording of the North Carolina statute at issue, it might well bar access not only to commonplace social media websites but also to websitesas varied as Amazon.com, Washingtonpost.com, and It is enough to assume that the law applies (as the State concedes it does) to social networking sites “as commonly understood”—that is, websites like Facebook, Linked In, and Twitter. Social media allows users to gain access to information and communicate with one another about it on any subject that might come to mind. By prohibiting sex offenders from using those websites, North Carolina with one broad stroke bars access to what for many are the principal sources for knowing current events, checking ads for employment, speaking and listening in the modern public square, and otherwise exploring the vast realms of human thought and knowledge.Social media allows users to gain access to information and communicate with one another on any subject that might come to mind. The question presented is whether that law is permissible under the First Amendment’s Free Speech Clause, applicable to the States under the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. The statutory bar does not extend to websites that “[p]rovid[e] only one of the following discrete services: photo-sharing, electronic mail, instant messenger, or chat room or message board platform.” §14–202.5(c)(1). Even making the assumption that the statute is content neutral and thus subject to intermediate scrutiny, the provision cannot stand. These websites can provide perhaps the most powerful mechanisms available to a private citizen to make his or her voice heard. According to sources cited to the Court, the State has prosecuted over 1,000 people for violating this law, including petitioner, who was indicted after posting a statement on his personal Facebook profile about a positive experience in traffic court. Petitioner was ultimately convicted and given a suspended prison sentence. See Brief for Electronic Frontier Foundation, at 870 (internal quotation marks omitted).The Internet’s forces and directions are so new, so protean, and so far reaching that courts must be conscious that what they say today may be obsolete tomorrow. (b) This background informs the analysis of the statute at issue. Like other inventions heralded as advances in human progress, the Internet and social media will be exploited by the criminal mind. Second, the Court assumes that the First Amendment permits a State to enact specific, narrowly-tailored laws that prohibit a sex offender from engaging in conduct that often presages a sexual crime, like contacting a minor or using a website to gather information about a minor. 15–1194 _________________ LESTER GERARD PACKINGHAM, PETITIONER delivered the opinion of the Court. First, it “[i]s operated by a person who derives revenue from membership fees, advertising, or other sources related to the operation of the Web site.” §14–202.5(b). At the time, a member of the Durham Police Department was investigating registered sex offenders who were thought to be violating §14–202.5. As a result, the Court must exercise extreme caution before suggesting that the First Amendment provides scant protection for access to vast networks in that medium. There is also no doubt that, as this Court has recognized, “[t]he sexual abuse of a child is a most serious crime and an act repugnant to the moral instincts of a decent people.” The government, of course, need not simply stand by and allow these evils to occur. It is necessary to make two assumptions to resolve this case. The Court need not decide the precise scope of the statute. Specific criminal acts are not protected speech even if speech is the means for their commission. Though the issue is not before the Court, it can be assumed that the First Amendment permits a State to enact specific, narrowly tailored laws that prohibit a sex offender from engaging in conduct that often presages a sexual crime, like contacting a minor or using a website to gather information about a minor. (Of importance, the troubling fact that the law imposes severe restrictions on persons who already have served their sentence and are no longer subject to the supervision of the criminal justice system is also not an issue before the Court.) Even with these assumptions about the scope of the law and the State’s interest, the statute here enacts a prohibition unprecedented in the scope of First Amendment speech it burdens.

But he was resentful of the late recognition, and of critics who dismissed his work as part of the Beat “fad.” In fact, Kerouac, who was an American romantic at heart—he thought of himself as a “lumberjack bard”—had grown increasingly skeptical of his fellow Beat authors Allen Ginsberg and William S.MOUNT KISCO - A property that helped birth the atomic bomb — part of World War II's secret Manhattan Project — is fueling a lawsuit over whether its current owner got duped into buying it by an ex-business partner who allegedly hid its history of radioactive contamination. Six of the defendants are accused of spreading or worsening contamination on 103 and 105 Kisco Ave., during the course of the site's history, which began when a refinery there produced materials that were supplied for bomb development.The suit, filed in White Plains federal court by lawyers for Mark Stagg, majority owner of 105 Kisco Ave., names 11 defendants, including the village and the U. After the refinery's 1960s demolition, efforts to clean up the property through remediation, the suit claims, "created radiation hot spots that still exist to this day."Stagg, of Purchase, contends in the suit that Paul Carozza, the previous owner of 105 Kisco Ave., brought him on as a partner when Carozza's business on the property, Richard's Lumber & Building Materials Center Inc., was in financial trouble in 2012.Stagg personally loaned nearly million to make improvements and renovations at the site to start a new business there, NY Stone & Masonry Supply. Further, it said, the statute of limitations had run out on the suit's claims.The lawsuit alleges that in arranging for the construction of Railroad Avenue, the village "further released and dispersed radioactive materials" throughout 105 Kisco Ave.

But he was resentful of the late recognition, and of critics who dismissed his work as part of the Beat “fad.” In fact, Kerouac, who was an American romantic at heart—he thought of himself as a “lumberjack bard”—had grown increasingly skeptical of his fellow Beat authors Allen Ginsberg and William S.

MOUNT KISCO - A property that helped birth the atomic bomb — part of World War II's secret Manhattan Project — is fueling a lawsuit over whether its current owner got duped into buying it by an ex-business partner who allegedly hid its history of radioactive contamination. Six of the defendants are accused of spreading or worsening contamination on 103 and 105 Kisco Ave., during the course of the site's history, which began when a refinery there produced materials that were supplied for bomb development.

The suit, filed in White Plains federal court by lawyers for Mark Stagg, majority owner of 105 Kisco Ave., names 11 defendants, including the village and the U. After the refinery's 1960s demolition, efforts to clean up the property through remediation, the suit claims, "created radiation hot spots that still exist to this day."Stagg, of Purchase, contends in the suit that Paul Carozza, the previous owner of 105 Kisco Ave., brought him on as a partner when Carozza's business on the property, Richard's Lumber & Building Materials Center Inc., was in financial trouble in 2012.

Stagg personally loaned nearly million to make improvements and renovations at the site to start a new business there, NY Stone & Masonry Supply. Further, it said, the statute of limitations had run out on the suit's claims.

The lawsuit alleges that in arranging for the construction of Railroad Avenue, the village "further released and dispersed radioactive materials" throughout 105 Kisco Ave.

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