Nigerian parents and dating Adult room chat 21

14-Oct-2019 07:14

we are both in our in our 20s and graduate students.I spend most of my weekends and a 3 days of the week hanging out with him most of the day. Love blinds common sense.” “No Nigerian, Ghanaian or Jamaican man is welcome in my house. Why is it better for me to be with a white man than it is to be with a Nigerian? How many marriages do you know of people from two different African countries that have lasted till old age? I pondered those phrases: “It’s for your own good” and “stick to your own”.

Consequently, I do not believe that people should not be punished because they happen to fall in love with someone that is not of the same religion, tribe, race or nationality.

Now, I'm sure certain family members and friends reading this are rolling their eyes right about now (that's right, I can see you, rolling your eyes, through the computer). I have no problem admitting, "I don't know," or "I don't know what to say," and I'm quick to question self-proclaimed "relationship experts" and "gurus." From time to time I get emails from you, my readers, asking for relationship advice and honestly, I feel just about as qualified to give relationship advice as I did when I was in fifth grade (although I gave some pretty darn good advice for a 10 year-old). This week I'm sharing one of those emails which touches upon one of the most mystifying yet uninentionally hilarious creatures known to man: the African parent. Let's take a look: I'm Shola O.*, a senior kinesiology major at the University of Maryland, College Park.

If you ask me my opinion, I'm going to be pretty honest; and I'll admit, 'tact' is not my strong suit. I spent hours reading your all blog posts and about your blog purpose, and I must confess that I love your blog!

Many Nigerian parents expect their children to eventually marry an individual that is of the same religion and tribe.

One of the reasons usually given for this attitude is that doing such will lessen marital strife.

Consequently, I do not believe that people should not be punished because they happen to fall in love with someone that is not of the same religion, tribe, race or nationality.

Now, I'm sure certain family members and friends reading this are rolling their eyes right about now (that's right, I can see you, rolling your eyes, through the computer). I have no problem admitting, "I don't know," or "I don't know what to say," and I'm quick to question self-proclaimed "relationship experts" and "gurus." From time to time I get emails from you, my readers, asking for relationship advice and honestly, I feel just about as qualified to give relationship advice as I did when I was in fifth grade (although I gave some pretty darn good advice for a 10 year-old). This week I'm sharing one of those emails which touches upon one of the most mystifying yet uninentionally hilarious creatures known to man: the African parent. Let's take a look: I'm Shola O.*, a senior kinesiology major at the University of Maryland, College Park.

If you ask me my opinion, I'm going to be pretty honest; and I'll admit, 'tact' is not my strong suit. I spent hours reading your all blog posts and about your blog purpose, and I must confess that I love your blog!

Many Nigerian parents expect their children to eventually marry an individual that is of the same religion and tribe.

One of the reasons usually given for this attitude is that doing such will lessen marital strife.

However, the treatment my friends have received, from my parents, makes me very anxious to bring home a white male.