Dating the rocks of the grand canyon

23-Nov-2019 10:45

Through a process called thermochronology, scientists can analyze canyon rock samples by microscope in search of crystals known as apatite, which contain helium-producing uranium.When the apatite is hotter than around 122 degrees Fahrenheit (50 degrees Celsius), the helium escapes, but when the rocks cool–which happens when they are exposed to the surface by a river, for example–the helium remains trapped inside the crystals.Heaton (1995) warns, "Many readers may find this book especially threatening because of its mix of scholarship and creationist dogma, targeted to a natural monument of great popularity." My aims in writing this article are to review creationist ideas on the geology of the Grand Canyon and to encourage members of the National Center for Science Education to review the field evidence for themselves by participating in the first NCSE "Creation/Evolution Grand Canyon Raft Trip", a float trip through the spectacular scenery and whitewater rapids of the Grand Canyon of Arizona, to be held in August 1999.

Rivers carve out canyons through erosion, a process that erases the physical evidence of their work.

The dating is not set by a certain amount of time like a week is, i.e.: seven days; rather, by specific events in the past as exposed by the GTS.

The following chart is a nice way of viewing how old the different layers of the Earth are in relation to modern time.

That concept began with eighteenth-century French naturalist Georges Cuvier, picked up steam with Charles Lyell, and it has been in vogue ever since.

This is despite the fact that it causes more problems for interpreting rock strata than it solves.

Rivers carve out canyons through erosion, a process that erases the physical evidence of their work.The dating is not set by a certain amount of time like a week is, i.e.: seven days; rather, by specific events in the past as exposed by the GTS.The following chart is a nice way of viewing how old the different layers of the Earth are in relation to modern time.That concept began with eighteenth-century French naturalist Georges Cuvier, picked up steam with Charles Lyell, and it has been in vogue ever since.This is despite the fact that it causes more problems for interpreting rock strata than it solves.Each year more than four million visitors visit Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona.