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08-May-2020 18:08

Painted marks are often in red and marks can also appear printed usually in blue or black, (although other colours were used) or impressed into the clay so appearing colourless.It is possible to have a combination of all three. Above is the image of a backstamp with the Spode name, the pattern number 967 and another small red cypher, which is a workman's mark. 1833 to 1847: the company was known as Copeland and Garrett.He went on to start his own pottery business making cream-colored earthenware and whiteware with blue prints.In 1770, he took over as the master of Banks’ factory, and ended up purchasing the business in 1776, according to A Series of partnerships between Josiah Spode II, Josiah Spode III and William Taylor Copeland resulted.“By the early 1830s, Copeland acquired the Spode operations in London, and took over the Stoke plants in subsequent years.Until he died in 1868, Copeland managed the business and then passed it on to his heirs.The factory was modernized in 1923, which included the addition of electric power.A little minor surface scratching otherwise excellent condition.Dimensions: 26.5 cm / 10.5 ins Our ref: SPODE46722 Buy similar now Maker: Spode Pattern: Aesops Fables Soup Plate The Lion in Love c1830 Probably the most charming scene from the Aesops Fables series, which was introduced in 1830, with designs taken from the illustrations in the 1793 edition of the Rev.

Here it is carefully looked after and is accessible to the public.By 1842, Spode was one of the factories operating in England making what is known as “bone china” along with Coalport, Wedgwood, Worchester, and a number of other companies.Josiah Spode apprenticed as a potter in the mid-1700s, and by 1754 he went to work for William Banks in Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, England.In 1976, Spode merged with Worcester Royal Porcelain to become Royal Worcester Spode, Ltd.As noted above, the company went through a number of changes in ownership and developed many partnerships over its long life, not to mention varied factories producing pieces in different locations.

Here it is carefully looked after and is accessible to the public.

By 1842, Spode was one of the factories operating in England making what is known as “bone china” along with Coalport, Wedgwood, Worchester, and a number of other companies.

Josiah Spode apprenticed as a potter in the mid-1700s, and by 1754 he went to work for William Banks in Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, England.

In 1976, Spode merged with Worcester Royal Porcelain to become Royal Worcester Spode, Ltd.

As noted above, the company went through a number of changes in ownership and developed many partnerships over its long life, not to mention varied factories producing pieces in different locations.

There are few recorded dates for the introduction and use of them.