Applying game theory dating

18-Feb-2020 09:31

If both remain silent, both prisoners are sentenced to only six months in jail for a minor charge.If each betrays the other, each receives a five-year sentence. In the book, various types of game are described (these being games played in every day life rather than artificial things with boards or cards), one of the most interesting being the Prisoner’s Dilemma.In order to save myself the bother of describing to you how this works, I’m just going to quote the explanation from the Two suspects are arrested by the police.Then we discuss some implications of the mixed equilibrium in games; in particular, we look how the equilibrium changes in the tax-compliance/auditor game as we increase the penalty for cheating on your taxes.We apply the notion of Nash Equilibrium, first, to some more coordination games; in particular, the Battle of the Sexes.Here’s our take, borrowing from Oyer’s insights: When the ratio of buyers to sellers is a constant, research shows (pdf) that the probability of successful matches between the two is significantly higher when there are more of both.In the job market, employers and employees are more likely to be successfully matched if there’s a wider pool.

A simpler suggestion from Oyer is to pick the biggest dating site you can find.

The more cynical (or perhaps realistic) of us would argue that there's a fair amount of game theory going on in the dating game.

For example a classic ploy is 'Don't ring for three days, because you don't want to come across too keen'.

I'm not looking for a social criticism of this thinking.

Rather I'm interested if there have been any studies carried out, where by the attractiveness of someone is assessed according to the availability they've communicated, etc.

A simpler suggestion from Oyer is to pick the biggest dating site you can find.The more cynical (or perhaps realistic) of us would argue that there's a fair amount of game theory going on in the dating game.For example a classic ploy is 'Don't ring for three days, because you don't want to come across too keen'.I'm not looking for a social criticism of this thinking.Rather I'm interested if there have been any studies carried out, where by the attractiveness of someone is assessed according to the availability they've communicated, etc.The mathematics behind the test including Nash's celebrated theorem and an example from the film, "A Beautiful Mind," are discussed as well as how to customize the test for more accurate results and how to modify the test to evaluate interpersonal relationships in other settings, not only romantic.